Spring 2016

"The Quad" Takes Shape - February 24

Architect Harry Teague envisioned a "quad" on the Bucksbaum Campus, bordered by the new Hurst Hall (left), Upper Studio Building (right), the historic mining residence structure (middle), and ponds (foreground). Photo: February 24 by Harry Teague.

 

New Teaching Studios 

The Upper Studio Building, which adds nearly 11,000 new square feet to the Campus, will bring many more teaching studios to these pastoral environs. This photo taken on March 11, shows the the "quad" side of the building.

Steel Framing

An office is framed in the central space of the Upper Studio Building, near a larger open gathering or rehearsal space. Campus partner Aspen Country Day School will use the building for middle school and science. Photo: February 19.

 

Studios with Views

In this photo taken on February 5 of the two-story Upper Studio Building, one can see the views that will grace these beautiful creek-side studios. 

Stairs to Studios

Staircases on both ends of the Upper Studio Building allow easy access for teachers and students and reduce hallway noise. Photo: February 12.

 

Chiller Installation

On February 26, both the air handler and chiller were installed in Hurst Hall in a dramatic display of overhead crane work.  

 

Siding Practice

The metals and wood-colored Minerit are shown here on site on a board where workers tested the siding techniques. Photo: February 26.

 

Hurst Hall on March 11 

By March 11, incredible progress has been made on Hurst Hall. At this point it is the furthest along and slated to be finished first.

 

Hurst - Another View

On February 26, architect Harry Teague snapped an interior shot of Hurst Hall. Walls are taped and ready for drywall. Acoustic clouds are being framed on the ceiling.

 

Old Flows to New 

The 1890s mining structure, on the right, is connected to the new cafeteria and offices, on the left, by walkways. The new building triples the square footage, adding 16,566 square feet to the 8,735 existing in the older building. Photo: Jan. 22.

 

Full View - Cafeteria

The first floor of the building pictured above will be mostly the new cafeteria, enclosed by glass on three sides. Administrative offices are above. Photo: February 26 by Harry Teague.

 

Offices Take Shape

Workers glaze windows of the administrative offices. Photo: February 26.

Cafeteria Infrastructure

The most infrastructure-intensive zone on the Campus is the commercial kitchen and cafeteria. When complete, diners can choose inside or deck seating, or the creek-side counter. Photo: March 11.

 

Prodigious Ducts

Massive air ducts in Hurst Hall heat and cool the building silently. The ducts are twenty percent larger than the ones in Edlis Neeson Hall. Photo: Feb. 26.

 

Hurst Hall Siding

Siding is applied to the huge outside walls of Hurst Hall. Placed at the top, translucent Kalwall helps "daylight" the room. Photo: March 3.

 

Acoustic Panels - Hurst 

On March 3, workers are seen installing curvaceous "acoustic wall clouds." These improve acoustics by diminishing right angles and flat wall space.

 

Hurst - Another View 

Here is another shot by Teague in Hurst Hall on February 26. The team of more than 200 workers is now on site seven days a week, twelve hours a day. Light snowfall in February helped progress.

 

Corner Office

A member of the Shaw Construction team works on the cafeteria/administration building under bluebird skies. This also shows something of the spectacular view from the conference room that will soon be here. Photo: February 12. 

 

Historic Lobby Space

Pictured above is the view from the second floor walkway that looks down on the central space of the Hardy Administration Building, also a historic 1890s mining building. Photo: Feb. 26 by Harry Teague.  

 

Closing It In

Sheetrock begins to be installed at the end of January in the stairwell of the administrative building.

Behind the Scenes

Behind the quad, there are two buildings to support maintenance work, including a garage and the "bike barn" to store and work on bikes lent to students in the summer. Photo: March 11.